Tag Archives: tools

SketchUp Three (Part Two) – Adding Details

Framework

Framework

If you’ve been following this series (Part OnePart TwoPart Three), you should now have a framework of a house. Now we shall add some extra features, and introduce some new techniques.

So, open up your House file, and also the blueprint you are working from, and we’ll jump in!

Doorways

To get into the house, we are going to need some doorways. My research tells me that an average door is 36″ by 80″ (about 1m wide, 2m tall). On my blueprint, the front door is about two feet from the left corner, so lets start marking out these measurements:

Guide Lines

Guide Lines

Snap Effect in Action!

Snap Effect in Action!

Now draw a Rectangle for the doorway, and use the Push/Pull to create the doorway! The Snap-Effect will keep you lined up properly:

Now that we know how to make a doorway (Draw Guidelines using Measuring Tool, then Push/Pull to create gap), we should make all of our doorways.

By now, we will have covered our Scene in guidelines, and rather than helping, they will be getting in the way! We could go round and delete them one-by-one, but there is an easier way! The “Delete Guides” entry on the Edit Menu!

Delete The Guidelines

Delete The Guidelines

Window

Window

OK, that’s the doors … we need to do the same for the windows! For the purposes of this tutorial (and simplicity!), I will be having all of the windows start three feet from the floor, and the tops be level with the top of the doors (80″, remember? This is 6′ 8″, or about 2 meters in new money). Again, put some guides in place. I’m making the front window 6′ wide, placed approximately halfway between the door and the right corner. Then draw the rectangle, and Push/Pull it. Again, continue around the house, putting all of the windows in place.

Doors and Windows

Doors and Windows

Actual Doors and Windows

Now, we want to put the actual doors and windows in place! Now, we can design our own furniture, and we already have most of the tools to do so (Draw a rectangle 6′ 8″ x 3’6″, Push/Pull to 1″ thick, BAM! Door!). Or we can rely on the kindness of strangers!

The SketchUp Warehouse is a repository where anyone can upload their creations, for other people to use. Maybe you will upload something there one day? For now, head to the File Menu -> 3D Models -> Get Models …   This will open the Warehouse, and allow you to select items to insert into your scene! Enter a search term (e.g. “Door”) into the Search Box at the top, press Enter, and Presto! Doors appear! Take some time to browse around, see what people have uploaded. If you find a design that you like, select it, and you will be taken to it’s Page, where you have the options to view a 3D render of it (note: can take a little while to load), or to download it into your Scene. Scrolling down should reveal other items, including collections and models that this item has been used in. I’ll not get into the complicated sections for now: Find a door you like (I’ve chosen “Flush Door” by user: “Luncai”), hit Download, and load it directly into your model.

You will notice that the door is now free-floating, and you can move it around. Find some free space, and click. Note: Do not try to place it in a doorway yet! Drop it near the house, and we’ll come back to  it …

Interlude …

The Art of Art (Part Two – Pencils)

As part of my Toy Soldiers hobby, I have been (slowly) making a Giant’s Causeway out of cheap coloured pencils. While this may hold some small interest for Art Lovers, the cause of this blog post is the Art that manifests itself behind the scenes.

You may remember my previous post, discussing the Art of my work bench, and the tissues and palette that build up with paint over time.

In a similar vein, I have inadvertently produced a sand-paper Art. I have been sawing and smoothing down pencils to create the hex-blocks needed to build the Causeway, and this has led to my sand-paper picking up the colours of the pencils. In this way, The Art of Art is produced, an accidental find, from the making of other Art.

I hope you appreciate it as much as I do!

Sand Paper

Sand Paper

The Art of Art (A Peek Behind The Scenes)

Paint Pots

Paint Pots

While not working on The Crystal Wizard website, or out finding new Art, I sometimes create my own. My usual medium is miniature figurines, and the scenery to go with them. But it is not these that I am writing about today, but instead the side-art that I find in them.

In this first picture, we see pots of paint, each marked with its colour, and variously faded by use. Although the pots themselves are hexagonal, the rounded lids prevent them from fitting together closely, and the opening-tags point in random directions, as the pots are pushed back once not being used. There are other sets of colours, including inks and washes, that are kept separate, and larger scenery paints and sprays that stay in drawers until needed.

More Paint Pots

More Paint pots

This untidy mix of of pots shows the chaos that can ensue after a long, diverse painting session, if some regimen is not kept to!

In frequent bouts of organisation, the pots are split by type, keeping the washes and inks away from the base-coats, and then ordered by colour and shade, with metallics to one side (I have not yet mastered the arduous “non-metallic metallics” technique!).

Tools

Tools of The Trade

Beside the main painting area lies the tool tray. A plethora of utensils, built up over years, for removing the models from their frames (or ‘sprues’), filing down rough edges and applying moulding-putty as needed. Pens and pencils not only serve to jot notes, but can be used for extra shading, with graphite giving a shiny edge to black surfaces. A pin-vice is also useful when trying to connect parts together, drilling small holes for paper-clips to fit into.

Tissue

Tissue paper for cleaning brushes

And to the other side we have our tissue paper, for wiping excess paint and drying brushes. Regularly replaced, each one holds a unique record of the work it was used with. Some paints bleed into the absorbent paper, forming strange, almost organic, patterns, while others (such as dry-brush techniques) leave straight trails across the surface.

Missing from this collection are the brushes, which I can’t seem to get a satisfactory picture of, and the water pot, for cleaning said brushes. The water pot does build up paint around its edge, but is refreshed so frequently that it would take too many shots to do it justice.

Palette

Artist’s Palette

Last, but by no means least, we have the palette. Used for thinning paints before use, and mixing colours, layers build up on the surface, dry out, and the area used again. Care must be taken that the underlying layer is fully dry! I use an old CD, with sections removed to use on the models themselves (it is an excellent material to work with!), and here it shows the more recent colours to be used.
Hopefully, these pictures are not only a record of the tools needed for making this form of Art, but are actually Art themselves. Meta-Art, if you will:

The Art of Making Art.